Five Oklahoma Teachers Share Their Day with Us

POE is hosting “A Day in The Life of a Teacher” today, Sept. 15, in which five teachers will help transport you, virtually, to their classrooms. Educators participating in today’s live blog will share various aspects of their day from classroom layout to lunchtime to lesson planning, as well as anything else interesting they might experience. Enjoy as we post throughout the day from these teachers:

  • Jessica Dickinson – Capitol Hill High School; Virtual
  • Anne Graham – Burlington Elementary School; In Person and Distance Learning Packets
  • Anthony Hutchinson – Chouteau-Mazie Public Schools; In Person
  • Tonya Daniel – Bennington Public Schools; In Person
  • Tana Sylvester – Cyril Public Schools; In Person and Virtual

Happy Tuesday from Anne Graham.
Anne is a 1st grade teacher with Burlington Elementary School. This is the start of her day where all is peaceful and the classroom is in order. Students (no parents are allowed in the building) at 7:40 a.m. 

Students must have their temperature form filled out or meet the staff on the sidewalk to get it taken before entering the building. Buses arrive at different times, which makes the halls less crowded. In our building we have four classes – Pre-k, kindergarten, 1st, and 2nd.

Anne’s classroom at Burlington.
When students arrive, they hang up their backpacks that line the hallway.

Breakfast is distributed by the coach to students at Burlington.

In the morning when students arrive, Anne fills out a breakfast and lunch form. Her school day starts at 8 a.m. but with meals being served in the classroom and not knowing the exact time they will arrive, it makes staying on a schedule a challenge.  Our administrative assistant and boys basketball coach delivers our breakfasts every morning.


Meet Jessica Dickinson. She’s a sophomore English teacher at Capitol Hill High School.

Normally the hallways at Capitol Hill would be full of students but the photo below shows what it looks like during passing period before school. The hallway is empty since the students are studying virtually.

Jessica begins her day taking attendance online and then starts teaching class online as well.

Empty hallways at Capitol Hill High School since students attend class virtually.
Jessica begins her day by taking attendance.
Jessica teaching class from her classroom at Capitol Hill High School.


The Burlington librarian with her suitcase of books.

Back to Burlington with Anne Graham.

Every Tuesday and Friday the school librarian visits Anne Graham’s classroom with a suitcase full of books for the kids. The students each get two books to read and then take an AR (accelerated reader) test on the books. Next to our classroom’s back door there is a book return basket mounted on the wall for the librarian to collect returned books.

Anne’s classroom library has at least 700 books for students to read. All my books are labeled with AR levels, points, and test numbers.

Here are a few of the 700 books Burlington 1st graders can read in Anne’s class.
A classroom book return basket makes it easy for the librarian to collect returned books.

Anthony Hutchinson

Anthony Hutchinson arrives at Chouteau-Mazie Public Schools in northeast Oklahoma.

Upon entering the building, Anthony has his temperature checked. Once cleared he heads to his classroom to prepare for a day of teaching instrumental music to students in grades 6-12.

He has taught in both private and public schools since receiving his Music Education degree from Evangel University, Springfield, Missouri in 1979. He has been in the Chouteau-Mazie School District for the past 15 years.

Anthony Hutchinson getting his temperature checked prior to entering the school building at Chouteau-Mazie Public Schools.
Anthony gets ready for a day of teaching instrumental music.
The band room at Chouteau-Mazie Public Schools.

Anthony prepares for third hour.

Anthony Hutchinson conducting music class.

Before lunchtime, Anne Graham works with small groups for her reading block where she uses the phonics curriculum Pathways to Reading. Anne is pictured reading to students at a half moon table, implementing safety precautions with cardboard dividers.


Jessica Dickinson brags on Capitol Hill’s cafeteria workers: “Our cafeteria workers do a wonderful job caring for our students. Students can pick up food in front of the cafeteria.”


Meet Tonya Daniel, a special education teacher for grades 7-12 with Bennington Public Schools.

Teachers have such giving hearts and during Tonya’s prep period today, she donated blood. “I learned that they (Oklahoma Blood Institute) get the vast majority of their donations from schools! “

Please donate if you’re able. Visit www.obi.org for more information.


Anthony Hutchinson has lunch duty in the parking lot today. “Fortunately, it is nice outside,” Anthony said.

Tonya Daniel (right) is on lunch duty at Bennington Public Schools with co-worker, Shelly Anteau who is also a POE member.


At Burlington, lunch arrived today at 11:11 a.m. While eating lunch, students in Anne Graham’s class rotate daily between watching nature videos and Spirit on Netflix.


It is now afternoon and it’s back to band practice for Anthony Hutchinson.

From sharing a music video with students in his 5k music class (left) to directing the high school marching band, Anthony demonstrates the important value of music in life, no matter what age.


Music class continues, but this time the students in Anne Graham’s class are learning about percussion instruments. While the students are in music class, Anne takes time for her planning period.  


Tana Sylvester is with Cyril Public Schools. Standing in front of a banner at school that says, “I Can…I Will,” seems most appropriate for Tana as she is teaching in-person and virtually.

In the video below, Tana sings a song with her Pre-K students and then goes over a lesson on chores. The video camera is connected online so students can attend virtually along with their fellow students who are in person.


Thank you to our teachers who participated in “A Day in the Life of the Teacher.” We appreciate the time you took to share a glimpse into your classrooms, showing us what education looks like in 2020.

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